How to check your driver’s record

By HUB SmartCoverage Team on January 11th, 2020

If you’ve ever needed to access your driving record in Ontario, there’s a number of different reports available.

A driver abstract is a record of your driving history. It may be required for insurance purposes, as part of a court case, by an employer or if you are applying to drive outside of the country. There are different types of reports and each provides slightly different information.

Knowing your driving record and insurance history is like knowing your credit score. It allows you to see, in part, why your insurance premiums are what they are and how tickets and collisions affect those rates.

All have to be requested through the Ontario Ministry of Transportation online, by fax, email or at any ServiceOntario location in person. The fee is different depending on which type you need.

Cost to order

These reports come two ways: certified or uncertified. A certified report includes an embossed seal from the Ministry of Transportation. It’s often required for court and other legal purposes. As of December 2019, most reports are $12 for an uncertified version. The complete driver's record, also known as the Freedom of Information driver's record, costs $48 or $54, depending on whether you want the record certified.

If you order online, you have to pay by credit card. If in-person at a Service Ontario centre, you have several payment options. An order placed by mail can be accompanied by a regular cheque.

Here's a list of some of your options:

  • 3-year Driver's Record: This includes your demerit points, active fines, as well as the Highway Traffic Act and Criminal Code of Canada convictions. It does not show past medical suspensions. Anyone can order this record as long as they provide a driver’s licence number.
  • Driver's Licence History: This includes class changes, licence renewals, residential addresses, and driving course completion. It can only be ordered by the driver themselves, a Canadian law enforcement agency or by court order.
  • 5-year Driver's Record: This includes demerit points, driver identification information, Highway Traffic Act convictions for the past three years and Criminal Code of Canada convictions for the past five years.
  • Extended Driver's Record: This includes driver identification info, as well as Highway Traffic Act convictions for the past three years and Criminal Code of Canada convictions for as far back as the records go.
  • Complete Driver's Record: This includes driver identification information, demerit totals, all Highway Traffic Act and Criminal Code of Canada convictions as well as residential addresses, collisions, driver's licence replacements, and renewals.

In addition, you can access reports on a specific collision including the names of the drivers, copies of your driver's documents like your licence application, a driver confirmation letter for out-of-province licensing, and a driver's licence check to demonstrate that it is valid.

As you can see, there are many types. It’s a good idea to confirm with the person or company requesting the record which type they require. And, it’s never a bad idea to take a look for yourself!

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